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It was only three days into 1956 when three boys from Montana, out for a hike on a normal January day, made a gruesome discovery they were unlikely to ever forget.

Abdalhamied Sharaf Aldein, a doctor in rebel-held northern Syria, has survived airstrikes and barrel bombs by the Syrian government, or its ally Russia, while caring for patients in at least eight different hospitals and medical clinics.

Now working at a hospital in Bab al Hawa, close to the Turkish border in a part of Syria controlled by the opposition, Aldein says the attacks have become so terrifyingly routine that it's hard to keep an exact count. Sometimes the hospital or clinic where he was working would be destroyed, other times just damaged.

The 145th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is this weekend, and there's a lot to yap about.

For the first time, because of the pandemic, the show has moved 28 miles from inside Madison Square Garden in Manhattan to the outdoors, on the grounds of the 67-acre Lyndhurst Estate in Tarrytown, N.Y.

President Biden's first meeting with Russian leader Vladimir Putin could be the most contentious between the leaders of the two countries since the Cold War ended three decades ago.

Biden has an agenda of grievances, complaints and protests pertaining to Russian activities abroad and Putin's suppression of dissidents at home. Putin has shown no interest in altering his behavior and has his own lists of accusations about U.S. actions in Europe and the Middle East.

Updated June 12, 2021 at 7:31 PM ET

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Police have arrested one suspect and are searching for another after a mass shooting on a crowded downtown Austin street left 14 people wounded early Saturday, two of them critically.

The Austin Police Department said in a news release that the U.S. Marshals Lone Star Fugitive Task Force assisted in making the arrest, but it provided no other details other than to say it is continuing to follow up on leads for the suspect still at large.

The attack was horrendous: Three generations of a Muslim Canadian family killed, leaving a 9-year-old child orphaned.

The motive was horrific: Police say the pickup driver who mowed into them targeted them because of their faith.

Friends gathering for the family's janazah, or funeral prayer, on Saturday, say want the Afzaal family remembered as more than just victims of a heinous hate crime.

Buying a coffee and grabbing a train is already possible with an iPhone, but Apple wants to replace the physical wallet completely.

To that end, earlier this week Apple announced a new feature to let users scan their driver's licenses and save it to their iPhones to use as a legitimate form of identification.

Water supplies are so tight in the West that most states keep close watch over every creek, river, ditch and reservoir. A complex web of laws and rules is meant to ensure that all the water that falls within a state’s boundaries is put to use or sent downstream to meet the needs of others.

To prevent waste and avoid sparking an interstate legal battle, Colorado has started cracking down on what may seem like a drop in the proverbial bucket -- illegal ponds.

A major primary election kicks off across New York City on Saturday as voters prepare to pick a new mayor for the first time in eight years.

Mayor Bill de Blasio is out at the end of the year because of term limits and as voters choose from a crowded field of would-be successors, the issue of crime and public safety has overtaken COVID-19 as the leading concern among voters — boosting moderates and serving as a stress test for the city's progressive left.

Most of us learned about the world's oceans in elementary school. There's the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian and the Arctic.

Now, there's a sea change ahead.

Thanks to National Geographic, you'll soon see a fifth ocean on your maps. It's now officially recognizing the Southern Ocean, the waters swirling around Antarctica, marking the first time the organization has made such a change since it started drawing up maps over a century ago.

Updated June 11, 2021 at 7:11 PM ET

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland on Friday offered a fierce defense of voting rights, which he described as an indisputable "cornerstone" of American democracy, as he outlined a series of measures meant to protect those rights.

Each week, we answer frequently asked questions about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions." See an archive of our FAQs here.

When Asha Gond first started skateboarding, neighbors in her village of Janwar in central India were aghast. They urged the teenager's parents to keep her busy with housework or get her married. When she walked through the village, skateboard in hand, they would sneer at her and make disparaging comments. Skateboarding is for boys, Gond, now 21, recalls the villagers saying.

Updated June 11, 2021 at 7:49 PM ET

Before there was Hamilton, there was In the Heights.

Lin-Manuel Miranda's exploration of the American dream started in his own hometown of Manhattan — which holds the first chapter in many American stories, he says. Specifically, Miranda's first Tony-winning musical takes place in the immigrant neighborhood of Washington Heights.

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Radio may not be the word that comes to mind when you think of the Pulitzer, but today, NPR is home to a new batch of Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists. The committee has announced this year's winners.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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BEIJING — Over the last three years, the U.S. and the European Union have imposed a series of sanctions on Chinese officials and companies. Now China has created a new legal tool to hit back.

Organizations with a foot in both the United States and China may face a tough choice going forward: By complying with American sanctions on China, they face the possibility of tough sanctions in China as a penalty for doing so.

NPR's first-ever Pulitzer occasioned a round of virtual Champagne corks popping and heartfelt cheers of congratulations across ... well, NPR's corner of cyberspace.

"Congrats to the Pulitzer winners. So deserved!!!!!" wrote Nina Totenberg, who does not dole out exclamation points to just anyone.

Updated June 11, 2021 at 4:05 PM ET

Darnella Frazier, who was 17 when she recorded George Floyd's murder in Minneapolis last year, was awarded a special citation by the Pulitzer Board on Friday.

The video played a major role in igniting a global protest movement against police violence, and was used as evidence in the trial of Floyd's killer.

A new federal program created by the Biden administration to reverse years of economic discrimination against U.S. farmers of color has ground to a halt.

On Thursday, a federal judge in Wisconsin ordered the U.S. Department of Agriculture to stop forgiving loans on the basis of race under a novel effort included in the American Rescue Plan relief package.

Updated June 11, 2021 at 7:04 PM ET

Three experts have now resigned from a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee after the agency approved an Alzheimer's drug called Aduhelm against the wishes of nearly every member on the panel.

During the pandemic, Reesha Howard got hooked on doing live audio chats from her smartphone. First she used Clubhouse, the buzzy, invitation-only app that surged in popularity last year with freewheeling conversations, game shows and celebrity appearances.

Updated June 11, 2021 at 2:34 PM ET

For the first time since the pandemic halted face-to-face events, leaders from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States have gathered for three days of talks in a British seaside town to try to address some of the world's most pressing issues.

U.S. Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman, hailed as a hero for his bravery during the attack on the U.S. Capitol, will throw out the first pitch at an upcoming Washington Nationals home game, the team says.

Goodman is slated to throw the ceremonial pitch on June 18, when the Nationals kick off their weekend series against the New York Mets.

An East Texas bakery is being inundated with orders, supportive messages and donations after revealing it faced backlash over its colorful cookies celebrating Pride Month.

The owners of Lufkin-based Confections unknowingly set off the chain of bittersweet events last Wednesday, when they posted a Facebook photo advertising their heart-shaped, rainbow-iced cookies and calling for "More LOVE" and "Less hate."

Part 1 of TED Radio Hour Episode A Love Letter To The Ocean

Catherine Mohr shares the story of a scuba diving trip gone wrong, where getting stabbed by a sea urchin transformed her relationship with the ocean... and ultimately led her to the love of her life.

Illustrations of Catherine's story have been created by Natalie Mohr for TED.

Part 2 of TED Radio Hour Episode A Love Letter To The Ocean

Marine biologist Marah Hardt is fascinated with the mating habits of marine life. If we want to save the oceans, she says we have to understand the weird and whimsical sex that helps populate it.

About Marah Hardt

Part 4 of TED Radio Hour Episode A Love Letter To The Ocean

Cone snails are deadly sea predators; their venom can kill fish and even humans. But chemical biologist Mandë Holford says that powerful venom can actually be used for good — to treat human diseases.

About Mandë Holford

It can be genuinely thrilling when a new drug is approved for use in the U.S. It may be a big step forward in treating folks with, say, HIV or diabetes or breast cancer.

But sometimes the very people who took part in the trials to determine if the drug is effective and safe may not be able to benefit.

That's the conclusion of a new study published in JAMA Open Network.

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