Shifting Gears

Shifting Gears features conversations with people making life-sustaining choices. Human hearing is tuned for options that enable healthy choices. The nourishing rhythm of the sun and soil steady those who listen and stories from those breaking trails into a sustainable future inspire us. Have you ever sensed change coming, before it hit? Over the years we learn to expect change, it is happening now - we live in a time of transition. When change occurs, if we shift gears and are alert, more options are available. Join Will Evans for Shifting Gears the first Wednesday of each month at 4:30 on KDNK.

Ways to Connect

The Endocrine Disruption Exchange

Theo Colborn is credited with identifying damage to human reproductive health caused by small doses of toxic chemicals called endocrine disruptors. Theo also explains why lack of public health protection of air and water is a concern to residents of the Colorado Drainage. Will Evans interviewed Theo in a three-part series in 2011. For parts 2 and 3 of their conversation, click here.

Karen Grey

 

Ten years ago, when this program was recorded, Karen Grey created an outdoor preschool where children were given an opportunity to find a part of themselves that our fear culture and push for academic excellence, even at the preschool age, does not allow. Karen is moving onto a new phase of her life. We thank her, wish her well, and celebrate the continuation of Carbondale Waldkinder.

Shifting Gears

Tyler Lindsay talks about his pursuit of flow and relationship with source water.

Paul Hempel

Paul Hempel returns to Shifting Gears to explain the value of source water education in the introduction of the “keep it clean, cause were all downstream” program extending from Vail to Rifle to Aspen.

Sustainable Settings

The fruit growing on the apricot tree at Sustainable Settings this spring affirmed for Brook LeVan the benefits of his long-standing, friendly relationship with the wild.

Will Evans

 

Dick Lamm,

 

38th Governor of Colorado,

 

reflects as an elder

 

on the

 

“Law of Unintended Consequences”

 

and our relationship

 

with

 

Paul Hempel is responsible for Source Water Protection within the Colorado Rural Water Association and has gift for standing with sufficient stature and neutrality to facilitate communication between the oil and gas industry and community water providers and swallowers.

From the archives: A 2011 Conversation of interest for those who eat, about how this act manifested.

What would Roaring Fork Valley Food Security taste like.  Years ago a process began in Maine to protect local available food sources and sales. Maine passed the “Maine Food Sovereignty Act” protecting local food security.

If food prices continue increasing, if the climate continues heating up what will Carbondale “food security” taste like? Will we eat locally available produce and meat?

Several towns in Maine have passed ordinances protecting local food security and the rights of nature.  Over 120 American town have passed local self governance ordinances

An interview of interest for those who enjoy eating.

Listen to this New Year’s vision from Michael Thompson. Drawing inspiration from the Maine food sovereignty act, Michael eloquently describes the opportunities we have with local food to grow the relationship of our wealth and health.

Ron Melmon

When the citizens of Telluride were threatened with a 600 acre development at the gateway to their town, they came together despite their differences. Ron Melmon, producer of The Valley, explains "Even in a divided nation there is a place where democracy and nature meet.

Town of Carbondale

Carbondale Mayor Dan Richardson explains the potential of restorative justice and processes in resolving issues and healing relationships that can otherwise linger in the gray zone.

Town of Carbondale

Dan Richardson, Mayor of Carbondale, steps into a conversation about global warming, identity, and the gray zone of unresolved perspectives.

Dr. Will Bledsoe

Dr. Will Bledsoe explains how a Restorative Way can put into people’s hands the practices and skills for right relationship. For part 2, click here.

The Strange Case of the Broad Street Pump

Sandra Hempel, author of The Strange Case of the Broad Street Pump joins Will Evans to discuss the myth and legacy of John Snow, the British doctor who discovered that cholera is a waterborne disease.

Courtesy Image

Hugh Kingery speaks about the American Dipper, also known as Ouzel, a source water indicator species.

Courtesy Image

Hugh Kingery speaks about the American Dipper, a source water indicator species, and how Dipper came back when the Elwha Dam came down in Olympic National Park.  When the source water flowed, the salmon ran, the ouzels fed on salmon eggs and thrived again.

Will Evans

Thunder River Theatre Company founder and Lon Winston enjoys living in a “you and me” world, and also explains what he does when pushed to the edge.

Bryan Austin, studio: cosmos

Bryant Austin extends to whales “the right to be” and he understands our lifestyle is killing whales. On their part the Whales learned it was safe to come up to Bryant and as a result, he has been able to photograph them up close - creating composite life size images.

Roderick O’Connor enjoys a high level of trust with his team, because they “burn clean with each other.”  He is straight with them and they are straight with him.

Julia VonDreele

Spring is near. Do you know your garden? Raleigh Burleigh, News Director of KDNK, grew up knowing a partnership with his family's local garden and compost pile. He talks about trusting the unique gifts growing around him and within him and remembers learning how to move during a transition on the edge of an abyss.

Fred Donaldson

Fred Donaldson explains as he gained skills in non-contest playing, the patterns of fear which had grown within him and round him fell away. Fred realized, he belonged to a vast network of touchable, trustworthy life-sustaining exchanges.

Will Evans

Marc Whitman explains how he organized available fire and water to save his home during the recent Thomas Wildfire in Southern California.

Will Evans


Today's guest is Bill Kight, writer, poet, and director of Glenwood Springs' Frontier Historical Museum, who says he learned to trust the voters' decision last fall.

Will Evans

Woody Morrison, a Haida Elder and History Keeper, in Vancouver, BC works today to heal indigenous people and describes how children grew up trusting everyone in their tribal clan. They trusted each other and themselves. When the Canadian Government took children away from their families and out of their villages by force, children were taught “Don’t trust, someone will cheat you.”

Katrina Blair explains she learned to trust herself, because the only rule for her growing up was “Be true to Yourself.”

Will Evans

Will talks to Brooke LeVan of Sustainable Settings for the third in a series of conversations.

Today's guest Paul Zak explains how businesses that understand the release of oxytocin learn to build trust.

Will Evans

Will's guest this month is Bob Whitehouse. They're talking about trust.

Fred Haberlein, Post Independent photo

Fred "Lightnin' Heart" Haberlein is a muralist, explorer, and all-around wise man (and sometimes wise guy.) He talks to host Will Evans about his recent trip to Yaqui country for the annual spring ceremonies.

Local resident Ross Douglas explains the Doctrine of Discovery, proclaimed by the Pope in 1493, gave Christendom absolute right to the land of North America. This legal structure continues to violate Native American human and land rights in the 21st century.

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