Colorado Capitol

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Colorado State Senator Bob Rankin is running for re-election to Senate District 8 this election. He spoke with KDNK's Lucas Turner about economic recovery, rural school funding, healthcare costs and more.

Glenwood Springs Lawyer Colin Wilhelm is running for House District 57 as a Democrat this election. He spoke to KDNK's Lucas Turner about economic recovery after COVID-19, energy, water issues and more.

courtesy photo

Representative Perry Will is running as the Republican incumbent for Colorado House District 57 this election. He spoke to KDNK's Lucas Turner about healthcare, economic development, energy, water issues and more. 

Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser said Monday he is considering taking legal action against the Trump administration to prevent cuts to the U.S. Postal Service that might threaten mail-in voting in November.

Weiser’s threat comes days after Trump said he opposed providing billions of dollars of emergency funding to the USPS during the pandemic because he does not want the money to be used to expand voting by mail.

Some top Democrats in Colorado, including Secretary of State Jena Griswold, are accusing Trump of trying to suppress voters by opposing the extra funding.

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More than 900,000 Colorado workers soon will have access to a retirement savings plan through their workplace. Senate Bill 200 recently cleared the Colorado Legislature. Kelli Fritts, associate state director of advocacy for AARP Colorado, said the measure will help the state avoid what she called a retirement crisis.

DENVER -- A coalition of 135 Colorado organizations is urging state lawmakers to use all tools in their toolbox to blunt the most serious economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic.

Colorado House Speaker KC Becker took to Twitter on Monday to vent about the grim task she and other state lawmakers will face next month when they return to the Capitol to try and write a budget during the coronavirus pandemic.

Frustration with stay-at-home orders is mounting in many parts of the country. In Colorado, protesters gathered Sunday afternoon on a hillside in front of the state capitol in Denver.

"I'm watching businesses close. I'm watching friends lose their incomes," protester Deesa Hurt told Colorado Public Radio. "We just want to reopen Colorado. That's all we want."

Gov. Jared Polis is urging all residents to wear cloth masks or scarves if they need to leave their homes during the coronavirus pandemic.

Polis says wearing the masks at grocery stores and on walks will slow the spread of COVID-19 and allow Colorado to lift its stay-at-home order sooner.

In response to recent COVID-19 developments and directives by Governor Polis, the Division of Professions and Occupations under the state Department of Regulatory Agencies will expedite licensing to increase the healthcare workforce.

The state legislature will adjourn for at least two weeks starting Saturday to help protect the public from the spread of COVID-19.

With its big political debates and historic treasures, the state Capitol building often sees thousands of visitors each day.

That has lawmakers worried about the potential for the virus to spread in the busy building.

When Blondie's Diner closes around 9 p.m. and a table of hunters finish their green chili cheeseburgers and head back to their hotel, the town of Naturita feels a bit like a ghost town.

There are two new marijuana dispensaries still open late with green neon signs, but on a November night at the start of hunting season, not many customers are partaking.

The only sound punctuating through the cold evening is a semi-truck idling in the parking lot of the Rimrocker Hotel, its driver trying to stay warm.

The opening days of Colorado's legislative session are typically jovial and largely free of partisan politics. The governor capitalized on that mood during his roughly hour-long speech. After an interruption from a heckler in the gallery shouting, "Ban fracking now!" Polis started with a recap of his first year in office.

There were the usual jokes and friendly banter between the House and Senate.

State lawmakers from both sides of the aisle exchanged hugs in a chamber that felt a bit like a school getting back to work after an eight-month break.

But amidst the pomp and circumstance of the opening day of Colorado's 2020 legislative session, lawmakers also drew some clear battle lines.