Connecting the Drops

Connecting The Drops: What Not To Flush

Apr 17, 2019
Maeve Conran/Connecting the Drops

Wastewater and municipal sewer systems around the country are dealing with a growing problem – people are putting things down the drain and down the toilet that are playing havoc with the system.

AH Marsh photo

A recent study found that a changing climate could cut the length of ski season in half in some parts of the US by 2050, and more by the end of the century. This could have significant impacts on Colorado’s ski industry, which generates almost $5 billion annually and creates more than 46,000 jobs. KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh takes a look at two resorts on Colorado’s West Slope to find out what they’re doing to protect the snow and the bottom line.

Hannah Leigh Myers

It’s been more than three years since the Animas River near Durango turned orange from the release of toxic mining chemicals. But the Gold King Mine spill may be inspiring some long-sought-after changes. For Connecting the Drops, Hannah Leigh Myers reports...

Connecting the Drops

The American West is grappling with a water crisis.  The Colorado River Basin system is over allocated, meaning more water is being drawn out of the river than is being naturally replenished.

The region has been in a drought for almost two decades with more hot, dry weather is in the long-term forecast.

Yet demand for water is growing. Colorado’s population could increase add another 3 million people by 2050. The bulk of that growth will happen along the Front Range.

This leaves water managers struggling to quench the thirst of their customers. As we explore in this next installment in our Connecting the Drops series, some urban water providers are looking for ways to do more with less.

Beer and wine made from purified wastewater are offering the public exposure to a type of water reuse with the potential to reshape water consumption in Colorado.   As part of Connecting the Drops, Hannah Leigh Myers explores water reuse.

Connecting the Drops: Fire and Water

May 25, 2018

Wildfires are a reality for those living in the American West…but the impact on the landscape lingers long after the smoke is gone. With an estimated two-thirds of U.S. municipalities getting their drinking water from a source that originates in a forest, fire and water are now inextricably linked. As part of Connecting the Drops, our state-wide series on water issues, Maeve Conran reports.

Connecting the Drops: Wild and Scenic Rivers

Apr 9, 2018

2018 year marks the 50th anniversary of the U.S. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act and it seems Colorado may be getting close to protecting a second river under the federal designation. KGNU’s Hannah Leigh Myers visited the remote Deep Creek water system and spoke to stakeholders to find out what makes Deep Creek a good fit and why it’s been 30 years since Colorado has protected a river as Wild and Scenic.

Maeve Conran

KDNK's Local Newscast airs weekday mornings at 6:41 and 7:41 during Morning Edition.

 

Almost 40 million people are dependent on the Colorado River. Traditionally, the economic value of the river was based on what the water could be used for, such as agriculture or mining. But, as Maeve Conran reports for Connecting the Drops, more people are pointing to the economic value of keeping water in the river.

Amy Hadden Marsh

KDNK's Local Newscast airs weekday mornings at 6:41 and 7:41 during Morning Edition.

Connecting the Drops: Pricing Water

Sep 20, 2016
Maeve Conran

As part of our statewide series Connecting the Drops, KGNU's Maeve Conran takes a look at how water is priced and whether we’re paying enough.