Conservation

Raleigh Burleigh/KDNK

Local writer Genevieve J. Villamizar is a regular on For Land's Sake. This month, she shares with Bill Kight her role as Artemis Ambassador through the National Wildlife Federation. This involves fostering community among girl and women anglers, archers, hunters and conservationists.

Middle Colorado Watershed Council

This month on For Land's Sake, Bill Kight features the Middle Colorado Watershed Council with updates from Board President Morgan Hill about projects including a new activity and learning center in Rifle. The Wild & Scenic Film Festival will return with a showing at the Vaudeville in Glenwood on Thursday, April 2nd and a showing at the Ute in Rifle on Saturday, April 4th.

Pew Charitable Trusts

 

On June 29th, the Bureau of Land Management released its final draft resource management plan for the Uncompahgre Field Office, encompassing nearly 900,000 acres of public lands across six Colorado counties. The Colorado Department of Natural Resources has since submitted a formal letter of protest, claiming that the draft plan does not adequately balance wildlife protection with energy extraction. According to Ken Rait, Project Director for Pew Charitable Trusts, this plan is one of six released in the past five months that demonstrate a disturbing trend in public lands administration. 

Rev Lennox Yearwood Jr.

Here’s your community calendar for Thursday, June 20th, underwritten by Sopris Liquor and Wine, offering Cerveza Sopris Mexican Lager in partnership with Roaring Fork Beer Company. For a list of today's events like Hip Hop Caucus leader, The Reverend Lennox Yearwood Jr. discussing climate change as a civil rights issue follow the headline...

 



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Wilderness Workshop’s summer hiking series has officially begun. Joining Megan Tackett in studio, Hike Coordinator Brandon Jones shares about some exciting opportunities." title="<--break-->" class="wysiwyg-break drupal-content">

Will Evans

 

Dick Lamm,

 

38th Governor of Colorado,

 

reflects as an elder

 

on the

 

“Law of Unintended Consequences”

 

and our relationship

 

with

 

Bureau of Land Management

The U.S. House Natural Resources Committee had a hearing recently on the Trump administration's moves to shrink national monuments and clear the way for mining and drilling.

This month's episode of For Land's Sake features a conversation with Karin Teague, Executive Director of the Independence Pass foundation.

U.S. House to Consider Bipartisan Public Lands Bill

Feb 25, 2019
Bureau of Land Management

The U.S. Senate recently passed a bill, by a vote of 92 to 8, that would permanently reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund. All eyes now are on members of the House, who could vote on the measure this week. The fund played a role in protecting lands in Colorado, including Great Sand Dunes National Park and Canyon of the Ancients National Monument. 

photo courtesy Wilderness Workshop

Commissioners now oppose withdrawing the popular area southwest of Carbondale from oil and gas leasing.

This month's episode of For Land's Sake features a conversation with Carl Segerstrom of High Country News. Segerstrom is a Contributing Editor with HCN's North Desk, covering Alaksa, Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho and Montana. Host Bill Kight talks to Segerstrom about the recent nomination of Rifle, Colorado native David Bernhardt for U.S. Interior Secretary and what's ahead for the Endangered Species Act. For Land's Sake airs the second Tuesday of every month on KDNK. Host Bill Kight talks to guests sharing thoughts on their personal connection to the land. Hear archived episodes here.

Mark Duggan

Voters in Colorado and other western states continue to support conservation policies for publicly owned lands, putting them at odds with the Trump administration's energy dominance agenda, according to the ninth annual Conservation in the West Poll from Colorado College.

Mark Robbins

Tourism is one of the strongest economic drivers in the state of Colorado and of many communities on the Western Slope. But the influx of visitors to some areas isn’t always seen as a good thing. For Western Slope Resources Reporting, KBUT's Laura Anderson reports on how one community is taking action.

Between growing populations and changing climate conditions, our water sources are only expected to get more crunched. Communities in some very dry states have had to get creative about where to get their water, sometimes purifying sewage into drinking water. More western cities are beginning to get on board, too. But there’s a problem: the ick factor.

Jose Alvarez, a supervisor at R. H. Dupper Landscaping, stood up from changing a sprinkler nozzle on a large grassy field at a homeowner’s association in Chandler, Arizona. He surveyed the turf, a patchwork of green and brown.

In The Desert City Of Tucson, The Grass Is Not Greener

Jul 25, 2018

Tucson, Arizona used to be a city of lawns. Patches of Bermuda grass lined residential neighborhoods, kept green — even in blazing summer months — with diligent watering. Over the decades, that has changed. Tucsonans eschew lush lawns for landscaping that is more in tune with the city's desert setting — though that doesn't necessarily mean there's no green.

Throughout the Western U.S., water conservation is in the toilet.

And that’s a good thing.


Brooks Kelly stopped at a display of smart sprinkler-system controllers.

"This 6-station timer — it's got a rebate," said Kelly, who works the plumbing aisle at the St. George Home Depot. "You buy it [and the] Washington County water district gives a $99 credit to your water bill. So, this is free."


A bipartisan study released Tuesday shows that most voters in the West could be at odds with Congress on public lands policy. Amy Hadden Marsh reports on findings from the Colorado College State of the Rockies project.