Governor Jared Polis

Goervnor Jared Polis

Governor Jared Polis says the state of Colorado now has enough tests to check for COVID-19 in anyone who is symptomatic. KDNK’s Lucas Turner has more.

Governor Jared Polis met with President Trump on Wednesday at the White House to seek more federal aid and talk about Colorado’s response to the coronavirus outbreak.

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Colorado Governore Jared Polis

Colorado is no longer under a statewide stay at home order, but Governor Jared Polis is warning residents he might have to bring back restrictions if they are not careful and coronavirus cases spike again.

 

Governor Jared Polis addressed the state this afternoon to provide critical updates on the stay-at-home order. He started with some good news, announcing that Eagle County will be the first in the state to “reopen.”

The coronavirus crisis could be igniting a revolution of sorts in the legal cannabis industry.

Thirty-three states across the U.S. allow for some form of sale and consumption of marijuana. And of those, more than 20 states have designated the cannabis industry as essential during the coronavirus outbreak.

While advocates are applauding many of the interim marijuana laws, they also say those laws exposes dangerous disparities among states.

Lucas Turner/KDNK

KDNK's Weekly News Reel takes a look at the week's top local and regional news stories aired on KDNK between Monday and Friday.

Scott Franz

Governor Jared Polis is giving residents a glimpse of what life will look like when the stay at home order is lifted as soon as April 27th.

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Xnatedawgx / CC BY-SA

Governor Jared Polis is urging hotel owners to open their rooms to people who are experiencing homelessness. He says the abundance of empty rooms should be used to keep some of Colorado’s most vulnerable residents healthy during the coronavirus outbreak.

Aron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post Pool Photo


  In a rare statewide address, Gov. Jared Polis said he is extending Colorado's stay-at-home order another two weeks to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Colorado appears to be competing with the Federal government for ventilators. The Denver Post reports Governor Jared Polis told CNN that just as the state was making a deal with a manufacturer for an order of 500 ventilators, the Federal Emergency Management Agency swooped in and bought the machines. 

Gov. Jared Polis is urging all residents to wear cloth masks or scarves if they need to leave their homes during the coronavirus pandemic.

Polis says wearing the masks at grocery stores and on walks will slow the spread of COVID-19 and allow Colorado to lift its stay-at-home order sooner.

Gov. Jared Polis said Monday the dramatic social distancing measures residents are taking in Colorado appear to be working.

Polis said new testing results suggest the spread of the COVID-19 may be slowing days after schools, bars and restaurants were ordered to close their doors around the state. He reported it is now taking five days for cases of the virus to double statewide.

Gov. Jared Polis is defending his decision to issue a stay-at-home order during the coronavirus pandemic.

During a news conference Friday, he said state health officials told him that if he didn't take aggressive action to keep residents isolated from one another, COVID-19 could kill as many as 33,000 Coloradans by June 1.

As of Thursday morning, Gov. Jared Polis' statewide stay-at-home order is in full effect. Polis said the state's previous social distancing efforts have not been effective at slowing the virus. So what can and can't you do under the new order? What jobs are considered essential?

Here's the basic rundown.

On Wednesday Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed executive order D2020-017, ordering all Colorado Residents to stay-at-home unless absolutely necessary. Click the headline to hear the full audio.

Gov. Jared Polis has signed a bill abolishing the death penalty in Colorado.

The governor also announced Monday he has commuted the sentences of three men currently on death row to life in prison without parole.

Polis Hopes #DoingMyPartCO Will Ease Social Distancing

Mar 19, 2020

Governor Jared Polis initiated a public forum this week for Coloradans to share what they’re doing during social distancing due to COVID-19. KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh has more.

Speaking in an eerily quiet state Capitol building that had closed to the public for a deep clean, Gov. Jared Polis ordered Monday that all bars and restaurants in the state close their dining areas for at least 30 days to help curb the spread of coronavirus. 

He also ordered the closure of large gathering places, such as casinos, theaters and gyms. Take-out and delivery service can continue.

Gov. Jared Polis recently outlined an ambitious agenda for lawmakers in 2020. He vowed to reduce health care costs, find a solution to the state's road funding woes and get more children into preschool. But some of the governor's priorities will prove to be contentious.

Capitol Coverage reporter Scott Franz sat down with the governor after his State of the State address to talk about some of the hot-button issues that are on the table this legislative session.

When Gov. Jared Polis used an executive order to create his new Office of Saving People Money on Health Care eight months ago, he said it was the first office of its kind.

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Colorado legislators including Governor Jared Polis and Senator Cory Gardner have been using Leadership PACs to raise money outside of their campaign committees. For this week’s News Brief, KDNK’s Lucas Turner spoke with Sandra Fish, whose story on how Leadership PACs work and what they pay for was published in the Colorado Sun last week.

The sight of dozens of plastic tubs being unloaded from a white truck in front of the state Capitol on Friday morning attracted a crowd of curious out-of-state tourists and political activists.

The tubs contained recall petitions targeting Gov. Jared Polis, and the crowd gathered around them quickly learned the groups trying to remove the governor from office failed to get the 631,000 signatures they needed to put Polis' fate on the ballot.

When Gov. Jared Polis walked into the Stedman Elementary School auditorium behind a marching band on Tuesday afternoon, with dozens of supporters waving signs and cheering, the signing ceremony for the full-day kindergarten bill felt more like a pep rally.

“Today, we celebrate the fact that this fall, kids from across our state will be able to go to free fullday kindergarten,” Polis said to loud cheers before he signed the bill.

From a robot voice that became the sound of fierce partisanship to a crucial debate over the future of oil and gas held in the middle of a blizzard, there was plenty of drama at the state Capitol this year.

Here’s a recap of some of the biggest moments of the session from its start to its final week.

Three weeks ago, Gov. Jared Polis stood outside Denver Health’s downtown hospital and made a long list of promises about improving health care.

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle stood next to him and cheered him on, while a glossy, 10-page road map to lowering health care costs circulated through the crowd.

Mark Duggan

Colorado lawmakers are working on a bipartisan set of proposals that would seek to lower insurance premiums and the costs of prescription drugs. According to Gov. Jared Polis, it will bring particular relief to rural and mountain areas, where health care costs are some of the highest in the nation.

Colorado Introduces New State Logo

Mar 27, 2019
Scott Franz

The new logo, complete with mountains, an evergreen tree and the letter C centering the state flag, replaces one that was introduced in 2013.

Mark Duggan

Voters in Colorado and other western states continue to support conservation policies for publicly owned lands, putting them at odds with the Trump administration's energy dominance agenda, according to the ninth annual Conservation in the West Poll from Colorado College.

Sen. Chris Holbert is adapting to life in Colorado's legislative minority.

"We will have our say but not our way," he said in a speech on Jan. 4, the opening day of the session. "We have the voice, but not the votes."

So how does a lawmaker without the votes approach his job? Here are three takeaways from KUNC's interview with the Republican minority leader the day before the session gaveled in.

Cheers from environmental groups drowned out nearby construction noise in downtown Denver Thursday morning after Gov. Jared Polis announced an executive order that aims to bring more electric vehicles to Colorado.

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