Immigrants

Post Independent

Roz Turnbull died on July 4th. She was a woman with a generous loving spirit. This month's Immigrant Stories honors her memory with an episode from the archives, speaking with Roz' mother Ditty Perry.

Beatriz Soto

Beatriz Soto is and architect, environmentalist and Latino Outreach Coordinator for Wilderness Workshop. She recently co-founded Voces Unidas, a network of Latino and Latina leaders in Garfield, Pitkin and Eagle counties. Beatriz talks about traveling to the US with her parents as a two year old and adapting to new places. She also talks about work with Wilderness Workshop, Voces Unidas, and the impact of COVID-19 on the valley's Latinos.

Pixabay

The U.S. Supreme Court blocked the Trump administration's efforts to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, but immigrant rights advocates say the controversy has created a chilling effect that could lead to an undercount.

Laurel Smith/Sopris Media

Members of 5 local religious congregations met in Glenwood Springs Wednesday at the Garfield County courthouse to stand in solidarity with immigrant families in the community. KDNK's Lucas Turner has the details.

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Gulbenk

Recent updates to the public charge rule will affect open immigration cases. Experts are advising anyone affected by the rule changes to seek accurate information and community resources. In this story KDNK news Lucas Turner speaks with Roni Morales of Mountain Family Health Centers to get more specific details on the rule. Roni Also shares a list of national and community resources.

CCLP

The Department of Homeland Security Wednesday issued the final Regulation on Public Charge that changes eligibility for legal immigration based on financial status, age, health issues, and other factors. KDNK News Director Lucas Turner spoke with Allison Neswood, a health care attorney with the Colorado Center for Law and Policy, to understand potential impacts of the new rule.

On this month's episode of Immigrant Stories, José Miranda describes his life in Venezuela and why he and his family had to leave their water buffalo ranch and start over in the United States.