Natural Resources

Daniel Rayzel/KSJD

In sunny southwest Colorado, the potential for solar energy looks inviting to homeowners interested in realizing long-term savings. But that investment comes with a large cost: installation. Hiring a crew can double initial expenses and diminish the overall return for prospective solar energy users. One Durango-based group wants to improve solar accessibility by eliminating that cost. KSJD’s Daniel Rayzel reports from the roof of a Cortez home filled with 21st-century barn raisers. He filed this report at part of the Western Slope Resources Reporting project.

Congressman Scott Tipton

Congressman Scott Tipton spoke with KDNK's Raleigh Burleigh about contents of the House Natural Resources Field Hearing in Grand Junction on Friday, June 1. The Congressman also spoke to The Resilient Federal Forests Act of which he is a sponsor.

Research Project Aims to Understand Fate of Rosy-Finch

Apr 23, 2018
Katie Klingsporn

One bird species population maybe declining due to climate change. Researches are working hard to change that. KOTO’s Katie Klingsporn has more…

Wikipedia Commons

The invasive Russian olive tree can cause havoc in river ecosystems around the
West. It competes with native plants and destroys habitat for native wildlife. Plus, it can be
incredibly challenging to remove from river ecosystems. But a group of organizations outside of
Durango has found a way not only to remove the trees, but also to help the community in other
ways. As part of the Western Slope Resources Reporting collaborative, KSJD’s Austin Cope has
more.