Snowpack

ToddPatrickPhoto.com

Sunlight Mountain’s Skier Appreciation Day on January 10th will feature brand new hike-out runs on the mountain's east ridge. KDNK’s Lucas Turner has more.

The West’s water security is wrapped up in snow. When it melts, it becomes drinking and irrigation water for millions throughout the region. A high snowpack lets farmers, skiers and water managers breathe a sigh of relief, while a low one can spell long-term trouble.

Bob Berwyn

Freelance environmental journalist Bob Berwyn writes about the effects of and responses to climate change from Europe. For this week’s News Brief, KDNK’s Raleigh Burleigh speaks with Bob about new research that suggests parts of Colorado are at increasing risk for intense rain-on-snow flooding events.

Wikipedia Commons

Snowpack that feeds the Colorado River is at record lows as we begin moving into the longer and drier days of summer. Water managers throughout the West are already sounding the alarm about less water flowing in streams and reservoirs. But as Luke Runyon reports, there’s another factor that could make things even worse...

The Colorado River Basin is likely to see one of its driest spring runoff seasons on record this year, according to federal forecasters.

Scientists at the Salt Lake City-based Colorado Basin River Forecast Center say current snowpack conditions are set to yield the sixth-lowest recorded runoff into Lake Powell since the lake was filled more than 50 years ago.

As the snowpack and moisture in the Colorado River Basin show large areas of moderate to extreme drought, some are wondering if the term “drought” is misleading people into thinking it’s a temporary situation. Do we need a new vocabulary to describe conditions in the West? H2O Radio reports.

The Sopris Sun

Sopris Sun editor William Grandbois and reporter Megan Tackett discuss stories from the latest issue, including Ski for Sisu, Roaring Fork High School senior Cal Brannigan's acceptance to Colorado's All State Choir, the Carbondale Clay Center's memorial fund for Angus Graham, and much more.

Dr. Jeffrey Deems

 


A new study is challenging the conventional wisdom about spring runoff in Colorado. A dirty little secret about how fast rivers will rise as the snowpack melts, that has little to do with temperature. H2O Radio has the story.