Water Rights

Earlier this year, Arizona -- one of seven southwestern states that rely on the Colorado River -- was in the midst of a heated discussion about water.

“It’s time to protect Lake Mead and Arizona,” the state’s Republican governor, Doug Ducey, said in his state of the state address in January 2019. He spoke to lawmakers in the midst of uncomfortable, emotional discussions at the statehouse in Phoenix about who gets access to water in the arid West, and who doesn’t. 

The Shoshone Hydroelectric Power Plant, just east of Glenwood Springs along the Colorado River, was built in 1905. It generates 15 megawatts of power and is a popular rafting spot in the summer. It also holds the state’s oldest water right on the river. For this edition of Sounds of the High Country, KDNK’s Amy Hadden Marsh talks to Emily Benson, editorial fellow at High Country News, about the impact of this single water right. Here's her story: The Tiny Power Plant That Shapes the Colorado River.