H2O Radio

PRNDI Awards

Reporting about water issues can, all too often, be painfully dry. H2O Radio is a refreshing exception and a vital fount of information about our most precious resource.

Frani Halperin and Jamie Sudler bring a rare mix of technical understanding, policy context and humanity to their coverage.

Their stories are comprehensive and exquisitely woven. As global water supplies wane and water quality is threatened, we need H2O Radio to tell the stories no other outlet is covering.

Susan Greene,
Editor, The Colorado Independent

Ways to Connect

Susanna Pershern, Submerged Resources Center, NPS

When veterans retire from the military—whether voluntarily or from injury—it can be a difficult transition. Gone is the camaraderie that gave their lives structure and often lost is a sense of purpose. A partnership with the National Park Service is helping wounded warriors to heal and restore connections by giving them a mission underwater. More on this story including pictures at H2ORadio.org

Missouri Sedimentation Action Coalition

We have heard about the deteriorating status of American infrastructure and most imagine crumbling bridges and potholed roads. But there’s another looming infrastructure crisis that’s getting little to no attention—and it will eventually impact everyone: America’s reservoirs are filling up with sediment. Their storage capacity peaked in the 1980s and it’s been going downhill ever since—sometimes with disastrous consequences.

More on this story at H2ORadio.org

Public domain

Thomas Edison became a household name for inventing the first practical incandescent light bulb. But because of what happened in a small town in Colorado, his bitter rival Nikola Tesla won the bigger prize to electrify our modern grid. Over a century later, could revenge be in the offing?

Utilities Tap into Once-Wasted Energy with Hydropower

Dec 20, 2018
h2oradio.org/


Experts say that in order to reach climate goals we need to move away from fossil fuels and get our energy from renewable sources. While most assume that will mean more wind and solar, there’s a clean and environmentally sound way to generate electricity that’s been hiding in plain sight but only recently became affordable to harness. For H2O Radio, Frani Halperin reports.

H2O Media, Ltd.

The U.S. Geological Survey keeps track of how much water flows through rivers and streams across the country to help plan for shortages—or at the other extreme—brace for floods. But there are more waterways than the agency is able to track, so recently they added a new tool that will not only help them cover more ground, but also help them learn more about this precious resource—all without ever touching a drop. H2O Radio has more.

h2oradio.org

Wildfires have always been a part of life in the American West, but with climate change, it’s expected they will become more frequent and more intense. While some effects of wildfires are understood, their impact on water is just starting to come into focus. H2O Radio reports.

H2O Media, Ltd.

Agriculture uses a lot of water. But what if that water were used for more than growing food? What if it could generate energy—renewable energy? It can, and a program in Colorado is helping farmers harness hydropower to lower costs, save time—and conserve the water itself. H2O Radio has the story.

H2O Radio, Ltd.

"Dryland" farmers on the high plains of Colorado grow their crops with whatever falls from the sky—no irrigation, no pumped groundwater—just what Mother Nature delivers. In recent years some have been trying to innovate to protect their soils and conserve water. But they're getting pushback—not only from their neighbors and their own families—but also from the government. H2O Radio has the story.

As the snowpack and moisture in the Colorado River Basin show large areas of moderate to extreme drought, some are wondering if the term “drought” is misleading people into thinking it’s a temporary situation. Do we need a new vocabulary to describe conditions in the West? H2O Radio reports.

Dr. Jeffrey Deems

 


A new study is challenging the conventional wisdom about spring runoff in Colorado. A dirty little secret about how fast rivers will rise as the snowpack melts, that has little to do with temperature. H2O Radio has the story.

Frani Halperin, H2O Media, Ltd.

Glenn and Kim Schryver are the caretakers of Grizzly Reservoir, just east of Aspen. Their job is to maintain the reservoir and the creeks that flow into it, as well as the 4-mile tunnel that sends the water east to the Front Range. Setting aside the heated politics of moving resources from one basin to another, the tunnel is an engineering triumph—and for many months of the year, the couple's only link to civilization. H2O Radio has their story.

Brendon Rockey

It’s harvest time for much of the country and also a time to plan for the season ahead. For a growing number of farmers, that will mean returning to their roots in an effort to conserve water, skip pesticides, and build healthier soils. It's a biological revolution that's yielding some eye-popping results. H2O Radio reports.

Wolf Perry, H20 Media, LTD.

The American pika are small, cute mammals that live in broken rock habitats or talus fields high in the mountains above treeline. Adorable as they are, these critters might have a serious story to tell about the impacts of climate change. Research is showing a correlation between the loss of ice and permafrost under the talus, and the disappearance of the animals. As temperatures rise, where pika live could indicate the health of a watershed—and foretell our future water supply. For H20 Radio, Frani Halperin and Jamie Sudler report.

Glenwood Springs PI

KDNK's local newscast airs weekday mornings at 6:41 and 7:41, and again at 5:34 PM.

On today's Local Newscast, H2O Radio in Denver talks to former EPA scientist Dominic DiGiulio for a feature called Drilling Apart Democracy. Carbondale Arts has announced that March 4th Marching Band will close out Mountain Fair and this year's theme is WATER. Bente Birkeland reports on two bills at the Capitol. Eric Galatas looks at opposition to selling public lands from hunting, fishing, conservation and outdoor-industry organizations. And the Valley Settlement Project has announced they are now a standalone nonprofit.

 

Between August 26th and September 8th, Carbondale Police responded to 562 calls for service. KDNK's Amy Hadden Marsh has this week's Eye on Crime.

Colorado has one of the highest rates of opioid abuse in the country. State and federal officials are asking Congress for more money to expand public awareness and hire more healthcare workers. Bente Birkeland reports.

 

Little Ditch. Big Deal.

Sep 19, 2016
State of Colorado

Living off the grid in Colorado's vast San Luis Valley, Chuck and Barbara Tidd needed to find a source of energy to supplement their solar panels. Their solution to use a creek on their property to generate power led to a legal battle that went all the way to the Colorado Supreme Court — where they won. That decision worries some who say the Tidd’s new right could upend water law that goes back 150 years. Frani Halperin and Jamie Sudler of H2O Radio report.