Jared Polis

Goervnor Jared Polis

Governor Jared Polis says the state of Colorado now has enough tests to check for COVID-19 in anyone who is symptomatic. KDNK’s Lucas Turner has more.

Governor Jared Polis says he will seek more federal aid for Colorado when he meets with President Trump at the White House Wednesday. KDNK's Scott Franz has more.

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Colorado Governore Jared Polis

Colorado is no longer under a statewide stay at home order, but Governor Jared Polis is warning residents he might have to bring back restrictions if they are not careful and coronavirus cases spike again.

 

Governor Jared Polis addressed the state this afternoon to provide critical updates on the stay-at-home order. He started with some good news, announcing that Eagle County will be the first in the state to “reopen.”

U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Kenneth W. Norman

Governor Jared Polis says all workers in critical buildings such as grocery stores and nursing homes will now be required to wear face masks. His executive order comes after there have been coronavirus outbreaks in at least fifteen nursing homes and residential care facilities around the state.

The coronavirus crisis could be igniting a revolution of sorts in the legal cannabis industry.

Thirty-three states across the U.S. allow for some form of sale and consumption of marijuana. And of those, more than 20 states have designated the cannabis industry as essential during the coronavirus outbreak.

While advocates are applauding many of the interim marijuana laws, they also say those laws exposes dangerous disparities among states.

Frustration with stay-at-home orders is mounting in many parts of the country. In Colorado, protesters gathered Sunday afternoon on a hillside in front of the state capitol in Denver.

"I'm watching businesses close. I'm watching friends lose their incomes," protester Deesa Hurt told Colorado Public Radio. "We just want to reopen Colorado. That's all we want."

Scott Franz

Governor Jared Polis is giving residents a glimpse of what life will look like when the stay at home order is lifted as soon as April 27th.

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Governor Jared Polis is urging hotel owners to open their rooms to people who are experiencing homelessness. He says the abundance of empty rooms should be used to keep some of Colorado’s most vulnerable residents healthy during the coronavirus outbreak.

In a normal April, the Colorado Convention Center in downtown Denver hosts a car show and business conferences this time of year.

But this week, construction crews are working inside to put 2,000 hospital beds in the convention center to accomodate a possible surge of COVID-19 cases.

Wearing masks in a nearly empty hearing room at the state Capitol on Wednesday, top lawmakers said they want to resume their session on May 18.

But they are also working on a backup plan that would let them pass a budget and other critical bills remotely if it's still not safe to return.

Aron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post Pool Photo


  In a rare statewide address, Gov. Jared Polis said he is extending Colorado's stay-at-home order another two weeks to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Colorado appears to be competing with the Federal government for ventilators. The Denver Post reports Governor Jared Polis told CNN that just as the state was making a deal with a manufacturer for an order of 500 ventilators, the Federal Emergency Management Agency swooped in and bought the machines. 

Gov. Jared Polis is urging all residents to wear cloth masks or scarves if they need to leave their homes during the coronavirus pandemic.

Polis says wearing the masks at grocery stores and on walks will slow the spread of COVID-19 and allow Colorado to lift its stay-at-home order sooner.

Gov. Jared Polis said Monday the dramatic social distancing measures residents are taking in Colorado appear to be working.

Polis said new testing results suggest the spread of the COVID-19 may be slowing days after schools, bars and restaurants were ordered to close their doors around the state. He reported it is now taking five days for cases of the virus to double statewide.

As of Thursday morning, Gov. Jared Polis' statewide stay-at-home order is in full effect. Polis said the state's previous social distancing efforts have not been effective at slowing the virus. So what can and can't you do under the new order? What jobs are considered essential?

Here's the basic rundown.

On Wednesday Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed executive order D2020-017, ordering all Colorado Residents to stay-at-home unless absolutely necessary. Click the headline to hear the full audio.

To help curb the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Jared Polis has issued a statewide stay-at-home order that goes into effect Thursday morning at 6 a.m.

Coloradans will still be able to go outside to get groceries, take walks and care for loved ones. But Polis is ordering most of the state’s 5.7 million residents to stay at home at all other times.

The order does not apply to essential workers like doctors and first responders.

Gov. Jared Polis has signed a bill abolishing the death penalty in Colorado.

The governor also announced Monday he has commuted the sentences of three men currently on death row to life in prison without parole.

In another effort to curb the spread of coronavirus, Gov. Jared Polis is ordering most businesses in the state to reduce the number of workers they allow at the office by 50%. The executive order was announced during a news conference Sunday.

He's also encouraging residents to remain at home except to get supplies, care for loved ones, drive to work or engage in outdoor recreation at a safe distance.

Jerry Raehal

Glenwood Springs Post Independent publisher Jerry Raehal joined KDNK's Gavin Dahl on Booked to outline some of his suggestions for avoiding panic and a mob mentality, and to explain the ways access to news is changing at the PI in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He also shared comments on a joint letter sent by The Colorado Press Association and Colorado Freedom of Information seeking assurances from Gov. Jared Polis that news operations will continue to be considered an "essential part of emergency personnel" during the state of emergency.

In response to recent COVID-19 developments and directives by Governor Polis, the Division of Professions and Occupations under the state Department of Regulatory Agencies will expedite licensing to increase the healthcare workforce.

Speaking in an eerily quiet state Capitol building that had closed to the public for a deep clean, Gov. Jared Polis ordered Monday that all bars and restaurants in the state close their dining areas for at least 30 days to help curb the spread of coronavirus. 

He also ordered the closure of large gathering places, such as casinos, theaters and gyms. Take-out and delivery service can continue.

Gov. Jared Polis is urging the cancellation of large public gatherings as several more COVID-19 cases are reported around the state.

Polis says gatherings of more than 250 people should be cancelled unless organizers can prove attendees will be at least 6 feet away from each other.

Colorado has its first two "presumptive positive" cases of COVID-19, the illness caused by the latest coronavirus. State health officials on Thursday confirmed an out-of-state visitor to Summit County has tested positive.

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As the coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, Governor Jared Polis says Colorado will be prepared for it if it gets here. KDNK's Capitol Coverage reporter Scott Franz has more.

As Gov. Jared Polis and Democratic lawmakers wage a war with hospitals over the rising cost of health care in Colorado, many residents like Jamie Harrison are still stuck paying high premiums on the West Slope.

"I think paying $1,700 a month for an insurance policy I don't use is not sustainable," Harrison said last week after finishing a day of skiing in Beaver Creek. "Something has got to give."

Gov. Jared Polis recently outlined an ambitious agenda for lawmakers in 2020. He vowed to reduce health care costs, find a solution to the state's road funding woes and get more children into preschool. But some of the governor's priorities will prove to be contentious.

Capitol Coverage reporter Scott Franz sat down with the governor after his State of the State address to talk about some of the hot-button issues that are on the table this legislative session.

Some of the biggest and most contentious laws the state legislature passed this year are going into effect on Wednesday.

Together, the new laws aim to prevent suicides and gun violence, protect hospital patients from unexpected medical bills and give local governments the power to raise their minimum wages higher than the state level.

When Gov. Jared Polis used an executive order to create his new Office of Saving People Money on Health Care eight months ago, he said it was the first office of its kind.

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