Western Slope Resources Reporting

Four Corners Farmers Embrace Co-Op Model

Feb 8, 2019
Daniel Rayzel

Drought in the Four Corners is placing further stress on farmers bringing their local produce to market. Seeking an opportunity to collaborate, some growers are placing a collective risk in a cooperative working to expand the reach of their products. KSJD’s Daniel Rayzel stopped by a warehouse in downtown Cortez to learn how the co-op helped farms through a difficult year.

Daniel Rayzel/KSJD

In sunny southwest Colorado, the potential for solar energy looks inviting to homeowners interested in realizing long-term savings. But that investment comes with a large cost: installation. Hiring a crew can double initial expenses and diminish the overall return for prospective solar energy users. One Durango-based group wants to improve solar accessibility by eliminating that cost. KSJD’s Daniel Rayzel reports from the roof of a Cortez home filled with 21st-century barn raisers. He filed this report at part of the Western Slope Resources Reporting project.

cedarridgeranch.com

As rural land is acquired for urban development throughout Colorado, some ranches are exploring alternative sources of income while sustaining local agriculture. For Western Slope Resources Reporting, KDNK's Raleigh Burleigh has more...

Mark Robbins

Tourism is one of the strongest economic drivers in the state of Colorado and of many communities on the Western Slope. But the influx of visitors to some areas isn’t always seen as a good thing. For Western Slope Resources Reporting, KBUT's Laura Anderson reports on how one community is taking action.

Paonia Artist Turns Irrigation Waste Into Art

Nov 28, 2018
John Melvin

 

During droughts, farmers on the Western Slope of Colorado have to use more plastic drip tape to irrigate. Last summer, Paonia artist John Melvin created an art piece to illustrate the amount of waste being produced and worked with local farmers and Delta County to set up a drip tape recycling program.  KVNF's Chris Marcinek has the story...

City of Fort Collins, John Robson

A recent report from the International Panel on Climate Change warns that countries must act immediately to mitigate the effects of global warming. As the current administration of the United States pursues policies of energy dominance, states and municipalities are challenged to adopt strategies locally towards a more sustainable future. KDNK's Raleigh Burleigh has more.

Christopher Biddle

Water Managers in the Southwest United States are witnessing record levels of reservoir depletion, and Colorado’s Western Slope is feeling the stretch, especially in the agricultural sector. As KBUT’s Christopher Biddle reports, one group thinks others should share the burden.

Wildland Fire Conference Addresses the Human Condition

Oct 24, 2018
Christopher Biddle

 

Wildfire is an increasing problem for Coloradans. They’re bigger than ever before, lasting longer, and affecting more people. That’s prompted some in the field of wildland fire mitigation to shift their focus towards psychology and sociology. KBUT’s Christopher Biddle has the story.

Cara Pallone

Despite its iconic stature, the plight of the native Colorado River cutthroat trout has been both challenging and uncertain. Cara Pallone, with KOTO Community Radio and Western Slope Resources Reporting, shares this story about an ongoing restoration project at an alpine lake near Telluride.

Apple Core Project Revives Rural Heirloom Fruit Production

Aug 22, 2018
Apple Core Project

The Apple Core Project in parts of Western Colorado aims to revive rural heirloom fruit production. KOTO’s Katie Klingsporn has the story.

A Mining Solution to an Environmental Problem

Jul 23, 2018
Chris Marcinek

The EPA is finding creative solutions for mine clean-up at the Camp Bird Mine above Ouray. KVNF's Chris Marcinek filed this report...

Community Composting Thrives in Ophir, CO

Jul 11, 2018
Katie Klingsporn


Tucked into a corner of San Miguel County, one small community is embarking on a big endeavor toward sustainability. KOTO’s Katie Klingsporn has the story...

Colorado Parks & Wildlife

When natural food sources fail to feed black bears, they often find new sources of food among humans. KDNK’s Raleigh Burleigh reports on how Coloradans are responding to an increase in incidents.

Eric Goold, KVNF

A scientist and Coal Methane group are working together on a project to remove a damaged cement cap on the water intake for the Paonia dam. In addition, they are assessing ways to deal with the aging infrastructure of the dam in conjunction with the increasing amount of sediment deposited behind the dam. KVNF’s Eric Goold has more.

Cara Pallone, KOTO

San Miguel County – which hovers around 8,000 people and is tucked into the Southwest corner of Colorado – can best be described as a “tale of two counties.” Cara Pallone of K-O-T-O Radio and Western Slope Resources Reporting, explains how a new farm to community food share program serves as a bridge between communities.

The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe operates a large farm and ranch on its lands in Southwestern Colorado. It grows crops like alfalfa and artisan corn, and raises over 600 head of cattle. The Tribe went through a long settlement process to obtain the water rights to operate the enterprise.  But just because it has the farm and the rights to the water doesn’t mean they can use as much as they want.


The gravel road that leads to the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Farm and Ranch Enterprise winds through 11 miles of desert grass and dry brush.


Farmers Measure Carbon for Healthy Soil

May 2, 2018
Wikipedia Commons

 


Farmers across a broad spectrum of the agriculture industry are embracing the ‘healthy soil’ movement. A key component of healthy soil is the amount of carbon it holds. But how can you tell? And how can you find out without disturbing the operations of a working farm or ranch? KBUT’s Christopher Biddle has more.

Research Project Aims to Understand Fate of Rosy-Finch

Apr 23, 2018
Katie Klingsporn

One bird species population maybe declining due to climate change. Researches are working hard to change that. KOTO’s Katie Klingsporn has more…

Wikipedia Commons

The invasive Russian olive tree can cause havoc in river ecosystems around the
West. It competes with native plants and destroys habitat for native wildlife. Plus, it can be
incredibly challenging to remove from river ecosystems. But a group of organizations outside of
Durango has found a way not only to remove the trees, but also to help the community in other
ways. As part of the Western Slope Resources Reporting collaborative, KSJD’s Austin Cope has
more.

AH Marsh Photo

 


Not only do local yucca plants provide an edible fruit; the fibers can be used as cord, the thorns as needles and the roots as shampoo. KDNK’s Raleigh Burleigh visited the Ute Learning Garden in Grand Junction to learn more about traditional applications of local plants.