Colorado

courtesy photo

Representative Perry Will is running as the Republican incumbent for Colorado House District 57 this election. He spoke to KDNK's Lucas Turner about healthcare, economic development, energy, water issues and more. 

Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser said Monday he is considering taking legal action against the Trump administration to prevent cuts to the U.S. Postal Service that might threaten mail-in voting in November.

Weiser’s threat comes days after Trump said he opposed providing billions of dollars of emergency funding to the USPS during the pandemic because he does not want the money to be used to expand voting by mail.

Some top Democrats in Colorado, including Secretary of State Jena Griswold, are accusing Trump of trying to suppress voters by opposing the extra funding.

Since the coronavirus pandemic forced much of the U.S. economy into a medically induced coma, 30 million Americans have filed for unemployment insurance, including more than 350,000 in Colorado.

As the graph below shows, the number of COVID-19 cases reported by public health agencies in the Mountain West is climbing. But what do those numbers actually say? 

 

More than ten-thousand Coloradans have tested positive for COVID-19. But state epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy explains the number of infected is likely much higher.

https://www.colorado.gov/cdle/unemployment
CDLE

Starting this week new categories of workers can file for unemployment with the state thanks to provisions in the CARES act. KDNK’s Lucas Turner has more.

Frustration with stay-at-home orders is mounting in many parts of the country. In Colorado, protesters gathered Sunday afternoon on a hillside in front of the state capitol in Denver.

"I'm watching businesses close. I'm watching friends lose their incomes," protester Deesa Hurt told Colorado Public Radio. "We just want to reopen Colorado. That's all we want."

Us Fish and Wildlife Services

 

A Colorado-based Facebook group titled “Go Outside and Howl at 8pm” now has over 500 thousand members, and it’s just one of many similar groups. Coloradans all over the state have taken to the new quarantine activity.

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Xnatedawgx / CC BY-SA

Governor Jared Polis is urging hotel owners to open their rooms to people who are experiencing homelessness. He says the abundance of empty rooms should be used to keep some of Colorado’s most vulnerable residents healthy during the coronavirus outbreak.

Colorado Department of Health and Environment

Making life-or-death decisions for others is not a task to be taken lightly. But, Colorado’s state crisis plans include the assembly of triage teams in the case that hospitals become overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.

Aron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post Pool Photo


  In a rare statewide address, Gov. Jared Polis said he is extending Colorado's stay-at-home order another two weeks to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Gov. Jared Polis is urging all residents to wear cloth masks or scarves if they need to leave their homes during the coronavirus pandemic.

Polis says wearing the masks at grocery stores and on walks will slow the spread of COVID-19 and allow Colorado to lift its stay-at-home order sooner.

To help curb the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Jared Polis has issued a statewide stay-at-home order that goes into effect Thursday morning at 6 a.m.

Coloradans will still be able to go outside to get groceries, take walks and care for loved ones. But Polis is ordering most of the state’s 5.7 million residents to stay at home at all other times.

The order does not apply to essential workers like doctors and first responders.

Colorado's community health centers have done a complete refiguring of their health delivery models in response to the COVID-19 crisis, and are set to take an enormous hit in their ability to continue to provide care if Congress doesn't approve critical funding.

In response to recent COVID-19 developments and directives by Governor Polis, the Division of Professions and Occupations under the state Department of Regulatory Agencies will expedite licensing to increase the healthcare workforce.

Music is blaring and grills are firing up at a parking lot awash in navy blue and orange outside Empower Field at Mile High Stadium in Denver.

Todd Endicott of Lafayette stands outside an ambulance turned Broncos fan-mobile. He outfitted this orange and blue rig for tailgates. It’s plastered in life-size stickers of players, and the football team’s logos, vintage and new. 

Proposition CC is pitting lawmakers who are seeking more money to pay for roads and education against residents who think government spending should have a limit.

Wells built to bring underground water supplies to the surface are being dug deeper to tap into dwindling aquifers, according to a new study.  

Nara Bopp was working at a thrift store in Moab, Utah the morning of March 4 when her desk started moving. 

“I immediately assumed that it was a garbage truck,” Bopp said.

Courtesy of NREL

Legislators in Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Washington passed aggressive clean energy mandates in 2019.

Courtesy: Colorado Attorney General

Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser, in the Roaring Fork Valley Friday to participate in a panel discussion, stopped by the KDNK studios to talk about the Mueller Report, the state's defense of the Affordable Care Act, and what he learned while clerking for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

When Gov. Jared Polis walked into the Stedman Elementary School auditorium behind a marching band on Tuesday afternoon, with dozens of supporters waving signs and cheering, the signing ceremony for the full-day kindergarten bill felt more like a pep rally.

“Today, we celebrate the fact that this fall, kids from across our state will be able to go to free fullday kindergarten,” Polis said to loud cheers before he signed the bill.

Transportation funding advocates are giving Colorado’s latest legislative session mixed reviews despite a bipartisan budget deal that boosted transportation funding by $70 million.

Margaret Bowes, who leads an organization that focuses on improving the Interstate 70 corridor in the mountains, said the money lawmakers added for roads and bridges was “just a drop in the bucket.”

Douglas rattles around a collection of glass jars in the storage closet of his Denver apartment. They're filled with sterilized rye grains, covered in a soft white fungus — a mushroom spawn. Soon, he'll transplant it in large plastic bins filled with nutrients such as dried manure and coconut fiber.

Speaking to reporters in the final hours of the legislative session, Gov. Jared Polis touted the passage of several health care bills and the funding for full-day kindergarten.

But he quickly faced questions about some recent setbacks at the Capitol, including the death of a bill he backed that would have asked voters to add taxes on cigarettes and vaping products.

The Colorado General Assembly didn’t end its 72nd session quietly. In the final days, they’ve taken big votes on some of the most consequential legislation of the year. Here’s what they’ve been up to in the final hours.

From a robot voice that became the sound of fierce partisanship to a crucial debate over the future of oil and gas held in the middle of a blizzard, there was plenty of drama at the state Capitol this year.

Here’s a recap of some of the biggest moments of the session from its start to its final week.

Scott Franz

Colorado will now join a dozen other states holding their primaries on March 3. For the last 20 years Colorado held caucuses to determine a party’s candidate. But in 2016 voters overwhelmingly approved a proposition restoring primaries in a presidential election year.

Will Evans

 

Dick Lamm,

 

38th Governor of Colorado,

 

reflects as an elder

 

on the

 

“Law of Unintended Consequences”

 

and our relationship

 

with

 

For Mitchell Byars and other breaking news reporters around the country, the police scanner might be just as important as a laptop computer.

Byars, who covers everything from wildfires to mountain lion sightings for the Boulder Daily Camera, said the radio traffic helps him answer important questions from residents.

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